Your Subtitle text

Bend Veterinary Specialists
Small Animal Internal Medicine and Surgery

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: My pet has been having some medical issues that my veterinarian is currently addressing but I am concerned that things are not improving. Do I need a referral to have a consultation with one of your doctors before I can bring my pet in?

A: This is a commonly asked question. While we prefer to have a referral request from your veterinarian we understand that sometimes asking your veterinarian for a second opinion to a referral hospital can be uncomfortable. Veterinarians all want what is best for their patients and clients and communicating your wishes for a second opinion allows them to fulfill that while knowing that they provided your pet wonderful care to the best of their ability.

Q: Are you associated with The Animal Emergency Center?

A: While we share a facility and frequently transfer patients between the two practices, we are not the same business. If we share a patient with the AEC, their services will be billed separately. If you have questions about estimated care costs for the Animal Emergency Center or if you have an after hours or holiday emergency please contact them at 541-385-9110.

Q: My pet is a current patient at Bend Veterinary Specialists. Who do I contact if my pet has complications related to current medical conditions after regular business hours?

A: If you feel that your pets condition requires immediate medical attention and our doctors are out of the office, or we are not open please contact your regular veterinarian or the Animal Emergency Center. Please see this checklist to help you determine if your pet needs immediate care.

Q: What is a Board Certified Veterinary Internist?

A: A board-certified Internist, an ACVIM Diplomate, is a veterinarian who has undertaken further specialty training in the discipline of Veterinary Internal Medicine, and who has been certified by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) in the specialty of Small Animal Internal Medicine. Veterinarians wishing to become board certified must complete a three-year residency program, meet specific training and caseload requirements, and have published research. Residents train under ACVIM Diplomates which ensures that the resident receives training that follows strict guidelines. Once the residency has been completed, the resident must sit and pass a multiple day examination. If the resident passes the examination they are awarded a "diploma" in veterinary internal medicine, certifying them as an ACVIM Diplomate. Veterinary Internal Medicine encompasses the disciplines of cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, immunology, infectious disease, nephrology/urology, neurology and respiratory disease.

Q: What is a Board Certified Veterinary Surgeon?

A: The term "ACVS Diplomate" refers a veterinarian who has been board certified (received a diploma) in veterinary surgery. Only veterinarians who have successfully completed the certification requirements of the ACVS are Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and can be called specialists in veterinary surgery. Veterinarians wishing to become board certified must complete a three-year residency program, meet specific training and caseload requirements, perform research and have their research published. This process is supervised by current ACVS Diplomates, ensuring consistency in training and adherence to high standards. Once the residency has been completed, the resident must sit for and pass a multiple day examination. Only then does the veterinarian earn the "diploma" of ACVS Diplomate. Veterinary Surgery encompasses all disciplines of surgery including general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, oncologic and orthopedic surgery.